Select Page

Category: Health

Free seniors health assessments at the Y

Elaine Gillmore was able to detect and correct her balance issues after taking part in the YMCA of Okanagan’s senior health assessments. Free to anyone over the age of 50, these give seniors a proactive tool to monitor their health. The assessments take place on Fridays: Kelowna Family Y on October 27 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. H2O Adventure + Fitness Centre on November 3 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Elaine has participated in four health assessments and actively recruits members for YMCA senior and health programs. After her first assessment, she realized she had good upper body strength...

Read More

UBC researchers test new technique to help with concussion diagnosis

Variations in blood flow may be the method to pin down brain trauma Sports-related concussions are a major public health concern and are notoriously difficult to diagnose. But new research from UBC’s Okanagan campus provides a new tool to help test athletes for recent brain trauma. “Diagnosing concussions relies heavily on patients reporting their symptoms. While there are other tests that may be used to help clinicians make a diagnosis, they can be extremely subjective, inaccurate and, frankly, easy to manipulate,” says study lead author, a Southern Medical Program student, and Ph.D. candidate Alexander (Sandy) Wright. “Because concussions can’t be...

Read More

Kelowna will go loud for kids health

Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran has officially proclaimed May 7, 2017 as Healthy Kids Day — a day where the YMCA of Okanagan, with the support of presenting sponsor Interior Savings Credit Union, will go loud for kids health in a festival-like setting. “Children today need us,” says Mayor Basran. “Times are changing and children are no longer getting the exercise they used to. It is more important than ever that we demonstrate healthy choices to ensure a vital and prosperous local community for years to come.” Children’s health is a concern across North America. The percentage of young people who...

Read More

New tool helps estimate spread of genetically modified pollen

Food purists may have cause to celebrate thanks to a recent international study directed by the University of British Columbia. The study, which evaluated the spread of genetically modified (GM) organisms to non-modified crops, has implications from farm to family. “Trying to figure out how far GM pollen will travel is really difficult,” says study co-author Rebecca Tyson, associate professor of mathematics at UBC Okanagan. “It is important to have accurate tools to estimate this, so that unintentional cross-pollination of GM material to non-GM crops can be minimized.” According to stastista.com, genetically modified crops in Canada are mostly located in...

Read More

YMCA of Okanagan to open fitness centre in downtown Kelowna

The YMCA of Okanagan is opening a new YMCA fitness centre located in downtown Kelowna.  The Downtown YMCA will be situated at 505 Doyle Avenue on the main floor of the new Interior Health Kelowna Community Health and Services Centre and will support the health and wellness of residents and employees in the downtown area and neighbouring communities.   This 7,500 sq. ft. fitness centre will offer a full suite of cardio and strength equipment, functional fitness areas, an 800 sq. ft. group fitness studio, a dedicated cycle studio, day-use lockers and shower amenities. Services will include group fitness...

Read More

New moms moving toward the bottle

New moms are increasingly using expressed breast milk (either pumped or expressed by hand) instead of directly breastfeeding their babies, according to a UBC study. The study also found that moms who use expressed breast milk typically transition their babies to infant formula feeding sooner than their breastfeeding peers, a trend that may impact the health of our next generation. “Breastfeeding is the unequalled method for feeding infants,” says Marie Tarrant, director of nursing at UBC’s Okanagan campus. “It has been previously determined that breastfeeding is important for the nutrition, immunology, growth and development of infants and toddlers. Anything that contributes to shortening the recommended six months of exclusive breastfeeding is a concern.” UBC Professor Marie Tarrant Tarrant and her research team, including co-author Dorothy Bai of the University of Hong Kong, studied the infant feeding practices of more than 2,000 moms living in Hong Kong. They found that during a five-year stretch, mothers moved away from directly breastfeeding their infants to using expressed breast milk, which is usually delivered via a bottle. “New mothers may believe there is no difference between expressed breast-milk feeding and direct feeding at the breast,” says Tarrant. “Although expressed breast-milk feeding provides greater benefits than infant formula, bottle-feeding may increase the risk of respiratory issues, asthma, rapid weight gain and oral diseases.” The study demonstrated that those moms who expressed breast milk were...

Read More

Daily emails and a glass of milk 

UBC researchers have demonstrated that simple, cost-effective email messages can help improve the calcium intake of Canadians. Mary Jung, an assistant professor of health and exercise sciences at UBC's Okanagan campus, recently completed a nationwide study with more than 730 Canadians who were not meeting Canada’s recommended dietary intake for calcium. Participants received an email—with evidence-based daily tips and strategies on how to increase calcium intake—four days in a row. Jung, a Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research Scholar Professor, wanted to determine if targeted messaging—making particular outcomes relevant to the population of interest—could be a feasible public health strategy for improving calcium intake. “Just four targeted messages made a remarkable difference in the consumption of calcium-rich foods,” says Jung. “The majority of our participants increased their calcium intake by one serving of dairy a day—pretty good results.” Rather than tailoring messages to each individual, which can be costly and intrusive, the messages in this study highlighted outcomes Jung had found relevant to her targeted audience. Specifically, she used evidence-based information including the suggestion of being a positive role model for one’s children, understanding the health benefits of consuming enough calcium as we age, and strategies to keep up the required daily consumption. Despite the known health benefits of getting enough calcium, such as bone health, less than 40 per cent of Canadians between the ages of 30 and...

Read More

Fitness app research combine psychology and technology

When fitness apps include personal touches such as individualized goals and contact with a ‘real live trainer,’ users tend to exercise more consistently, a UBC study concludes. Mary Jung, an assistant professor in UBC Okanagan’s School of Health and Exercise Sciences, recently completed an eight-week study that examined the effectiveness of fitness apps. “More than ever before, mobile apps provide an opportunity to provide real-time feedback and support to the public and specialized health populations,” says Jung. “In order for app users to reach their full potential, we need to ensure that they stay engaged and are provided with...

Read More

A Good End: a look at doctor-assisted death

As the June 6 deadline approaches for the federal government to impose doctor-assisted death legislation, we revisit one of our stories looking at both sides of the right-to-die debate within the Okanagan. As poet Dylan Thomas urged, we do not go gently, we fight with our last dying breath to hold onto the inexplicably beautiful gift of life. Yet dying is our destiny. Just as life is lived in a profoundly personal way for each of us, death is unique for everyone—a sentiment at the heart of the hotly debated topic of assisted dying. I began researching the “right...

Read More

New ultrasounds enhance medical training in the Okanagan

UBC medical students and health-care providers will get more hands-on training thanks to a recent donation of two new portable ultrasound machines to the UBC Southern Medical Program. A recent gift from The Colin & Lois Pritchard Foundation allowed the program to purchase two machines that will be dedicated for training in basic ultrasound proficiency, benefiting multiple learner groups at Kelowna General Hospital and physicians in the southern interior. Ultrasound is a crucial and versatile tool within the field of medicine and considered indispensable in areas such as emergency medicine, surgery, critical care, obstetrics and gynecology. Many physicians describe...

Read More

UBC prof. looking for seniors with hearing loss for new study

UBC Okanagan’s widely popular Walk, ‘n Talk for your Life program — that creates exercise and safe social settings for local seniors — is branching out. Assoc. Prof. Charlotte Jones, who teaches with UBC’s Southern Medical Program, initiated Walk ‘n Talk in 2014, is now looking for seniors who are living with hearing loss. In partnership with YMCA of Okanagan (Rutland Family YMCA), Jones is looking for people, aged 65 and older, to participate in Walk, Talk and Listen. “Hearing loss is one of the most common chronic health problems in North America,” says Jones, noting that audiometry results...

Read More

30,000 giveaway for small business okanagan

Current Issue

Current Issue

June 2018 Okanagan Life

Purchase

Upcoming Events

There are no upcoming events.

TWITTER

Error: Please enter a valid email address

Error: Invalid email

Error: Please enter your first name

Error: Please enter your last name

Error: Please enter a username

Error: Please enter a password

Error: Please confirm your password

Error: Password and password confirmation do not match